Kids Read

History, Every Day & Up Close

History-with-a-capital-H can be difficult for some kids to grasp. ("Boring!"; "What does this have to do with me?"; etc.) One way to make history real (and relevant) is to prepare students with interesting background knowledge about the nitty-gritty, daily details of everyday lives of real people in history.

The Day the Children Celebrated Books (and We Celebrated Children)

"Children's Day" began in 1925 to bring attention to the importance and well-being of children. Almost from the beginning, the Association for Library Services to Children (ALSC), a division of the American Library Association, has been involved.

Officially, "El Dia de los Ninos/El Dia de los Libros" - also known as Children's Day/Book Day, or just "Dia" - is an opportunity for libraries to connect children with diverse books and all of the wonderful learning and growing that great literature can bring.

Windows and Mirrors: "The Snowy Day"

A famous librarian dictum (yes, there are famous librarian dictums!) is that picture books should be both windows and mirrors for children.

Windows: into other worlds, knowledge, meaning.

Mirrors: reflecting unique experiences, cultures, and lives.

Before "The Snowy Day" by Ezra Jack Keats was published in 1962, there were a lot of windows for African-American children...but no real mirrors.

Building Readers from the Brain Out

The Tulsa City-County Library is dedicated to supporting the 5 activities that early literacy researchers and advocates say help babies and young children grow into successful readers and students. Every storytime at the library focuses on at least one of the following "Build A Reader" activities:

Reading - Reading aloud remains the single most effective way to help children become readers. Not only does it introduce children to the concept of print, but it also encourages a deep and personal motivation for reading later on.

The Right to Play

Not only is playing an inherently joyful activity, there are countless research studies proving that play has rich cognitive benefits and will support your child's intellectual growth.

It's also a human right! While on the surface it might seem ridiculous to lump making a LEGO pirate ship or using a scarf to play peek-a-boo with having access to clean water, "The Right to Play" is important enough to be codified in the Universal Declaraion of Human Rights (Article #24).

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