Kids Read

'Tis the Season... To Sing!

One of my fondest memories is sitting under the Christmas tree with my dad singing carols and other winter songs. My sisters and I would snuggle next to him and join in with all of our kid hearts. Our favorites were the cheerful refrains (and happy ending) of "Frosty the Snowman" and the contemplative beauty of "Lord of the Dance."

Here's the thing: my dad is a wonderful man, but singing is not one of his many gifts. Despite the wrong pitches and off notes, every year we looked forward to this special tradition with Dad.

Gift Books: "Practical Literacy" Meets Holiday Need

If you're looking for a way for your kids or students to get involved in holiday gift-giving - but don't want to break the bank - consider helping them conceive and create "gift books" for the special people in their lives.

What Is Moral & What Is Story: "Strictly No Elephants"

Introducing moral issues in children's books has a long - and not always good - history. Often, the moral is too obvious and the story bland. Presenting an engaging story is ignored at the expense of getting across the moral precept.

Fortunately, the new picture book "Strictly No Elephants" - written by Lisa Mantchev and illustrated by Taeeun Yoo - manages to pack a powerful moral punch supporting fairness, friendship, and acceptance...without sacrificing appealing characters, an interesting situation, or a surprising story.

"Wheel Friends" Storytime

Join us for a special storytime at the Central Library next week with Ms. Wheelchair Oklahoma, Cailan Fry!

"Wheel Friends" Storytime

Tuesday, November 29

10:30 a.m.

Central Library Storytime Room

(400 Civic Center)

Ms. Wheelchair Oklahoma, Cailan Fry, will read books about friends and neighbors who might move differently! Songs, movements, and fun activities, particularly for families with children ages 2 to 5.

An Attitude of Gratitude

It is common practice for many families to share what they are grateful for, and why, at the Thanksgiving table. Who hasn't delighted in a child's simple gratitude for things like recess, Grandma's cinammon rolls, and the new puppy?

One way to continue or start this Thanksgiving tradition in a way that will support literacy development is to create "gratitude journals" where child can write or draw (or both) what they are grateful for. (By the way, a "journal" can be as simple as stapling two or three pieces of paper together.)

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