Reading Addict

Common As a Penny by Rebecca Howard

Rebecca Howard

Many of the books that I read are about common things—marriage, family, career—the stuff of everyday life. Often these types of books are unfairly categorized as women’s fiction, but I think taking our cue from the Young Adult genre, we should describe them as realistic fiction. There are no dystopian societies, serial killers, bank heists, spaceships, or demon overlords in these novels-- just mothers, daughters, sons, brothers, spouses, and partners. These novels mine the fields of ordinary for stories, showing us how the ordinary can be artful.

The Thrill of It All by Cindy Hulsey

There is nothing more thrilling than discovering a new author.  As a librarian I’m exposed to numerous new authors and titles, and it can be daunting to sift through all of them to find the gems. New books are often disappointing, but occasionally I’ll find one that makes me count the minutes until I can race home, fling open the pages and spend time with characters who are so real they jump off the page.  I recently found such a book by first novelist Rebecca Rotert called Last Night at the Blue Angel.

Enough Is Enough by Will Thomas

I’ve got this crazy notion that people should write their own books.  There should be no more novels by assembly line, no more “here, write a novel based on my idea and we’ll publish under my name”, and no more legacy novels, with modern authors using former authors’ characters “from the estate of”. Some people are making a lot of money, but at whose expense? I’m wondering if it is ours.

Reading Is a Makerspace by Rebecca Howard

Maker culture is all the rage right now and for good reason.  Makerspaces foster creativity, collaboration, and problem-solving. They encourage people to look at things in new, different ways and give reluctant learners a safe place to explore science, math, art, and technology. These learning environments build confidence and inspire ingenuity. And as liberating and fun as maker culture is, I contend that libraries have been part of maker culture since the beginning, just as we are today in some new, exciting ways (Have you tried that 3-D printer out at Librarium?). 

Haunted by the Golem and the Jinni by Adrienne Teague

I cannot stop thinking about Helene Wecker's book, The Golem and the Jinni. I finished it three days ago, but I just can’t get it out of my head.

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