Reading Addict

RIP Pat Conroy by Cindy Hulsey

Last week the world lost a great voice of Southern Literature. Pat Conroy died of pancreatic cancer at the age of 70 only a month after being diagnosed.

Conroy’s prose is leisurely, lyrical and highly descriptive. He was a natural and gifted storyteller, who used the pain of his own past to imbue his characters with realistic layers of emotion. He explored the human condition with depth and passion, and reading a Conroy novel is both exhausting and redemptive.

A Creepy, Weird and Magical Read by Adrienne Teague

When you think of Scandinavian Fiction, do you think of Harry Nesbo and Stieg Larsson? While those books are pretty amazing, The Rabbit Back Literature Society by Pasi Ilmari Jääskeläinen is nothing like those. It's haunting and creepy and weird, yes, but it's also funny and beautiful and magical.

Writers' Favorite Bookstores by Cindy Hulsey

After years of struggling to compete with mega-chain bookstores and Amazon, and in spite of those who said print books would go the way of the horse and buggy, independent bookstores are on the rise. In a lovely book called My Bookstore: Writers Celebrate Their Favorite Places to Browse, Read, and Shop, literary luminaries such as Isabel Allende, Wendell Berry, Ann Patchett and dozens more, have written short essays about bookstores that have played an important part in their lives.

Back Roads by Adrienne Teague

Deep South by Paul Theroux pushed all my voyeuristic buttons.

Stranger in a Strange Land by Cindy Hulsey

The Expatriates by Janice Y. K. Lee is a compelling story about three American women living in contemporary Hong Kong. Margaret, a landscape architect has relocated with her three children because of her husband’s job, as has Hilary, a wealthy woman whose life feels empty without a much-desired child. Mercy is a recent graduate of Columbia who is looking for a job and also searching for herself.