Reading Addict

The PoMo Historical by Nick Abrahamson

Photo of Nick Abrahamson

Postmodern seems to be one of those words academics love to throw around, while others might see the term at best as nebulous or at worst intimidating.  Like the prefix ‘meta-’, or perhaps an art movement, it can mean many things simultaneously: postmodernism has its hallmarks, some elements that reappear across works within the tradition.  But it doesn’t have to be scary.  Think of Post-rock, also a very vague term for a music genre that is mostly defined by long instrumentals.  This can refer to movements of Bach-ian complexities.  Or a cinematic band such as Explosions in the Sky that s

Girls in Trouble by Rebecca Howard

I recently assured my niece that no interesting adults were popular in high school.  This isn’t scientifically verified; I just have a hunch.  I kind of hated high school—the football, the parties, the homogeny.  Truth is, I remember very little about it.

Reading for Dark Days

I’ve recently experienced a loss in my family, and I notice that I’m having a lot of difficulty reading full length novels.  It’s hard for me to concentrate for longer stretches of time, and I find myself having to re-read passages to piece together how characters connect or how plot is progressing.  I’ve left a lot of books abandoned this month—sad piles with bookmarks at page 180, page 50, even page 10.  These temporarily under-appreciated books are ones I will come back to, but not now.  Fortunate

Work It Out by Laura Raphael

I love my job (I really, really do), but I’ve always been curious about what other people do for a living – how they spend their days, what issues and ideas and conflicts and goals of, say, a tax attorney, or a graphic designer, or a paper salesman. (Well, maybe not the last one. “The Office” pretty much fills that gap in my curiosity.)
 

Not to Be Missed by Rebecca Howard

I read a lot of new fiction, in large part to stay current about what kinds of titles library patrons will be requesting.  So, it’s always nice when a book that I missed when it was initially released becomes one of my favorites and introduces me to an author’s body of work.  I recently finished Crescent by Diana Abu-Jaber, a beautiful prayer of a novel that is as much poetry as prose.  Published i

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