Reading Addict

Happy Books by Cindy Hulsey

I’ve been thinking about the concept of happiness quite a bit lately.  Maybe it’s because I’m growing older and wondering what it’s all about, or because I lost my father-in-law this year, or because the world becomes more complex and demanding by the minute.  The good news is that science has revealed that we can actually change our brains, making happiness attainable.  Two good books about how our brains adapt are The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains by Nicholas Carr, whi

Art of Conversation by Rebecca Howard

I discovered Emily Bronte in 1992.  I wasn’t the first to discover her and I won’t be the last, but my initial reading of Wuthering Heights during my 17th year was as marvelous a discovery as any.  See, Wuthering Heights was written for me.  Sure, you’ve read it, too, but I daresay it’s a different book for me than it is for you and that’s why people continue to read it and

Blindside Books, or, Good Lord! Reads by Laura Raphael

You know how there are some books that, when you pick them up, you’re pretty sure you’re only going to read a few pages and then release it back into the wild or to its 2,000 library holds? And then you discover that it is, in fact, one of the best reads ever, and you can’t put it down, and you’ve been completely blindsided by this heretofore-unloved-by-you but now precious-work-of-genius book? No? That’s just me?

Infinite Jest . . . Some Very Disjointed Thoughts by Nick Abrahamson

In the pursuit of exploring my own literature derived masochism, I recently tackled David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest, a notoriously ‘difficult’ novel.   Over 900 pages of narrative combined with 300 pages of footnotes later, I have some very brief, truncated thoughts on the text.  These epistles do not represent the whole of the superbly rich experience (an ongoing series into perpetuity could ma

Embracing Eccentricities by Rebecca Howard

Generally speaking, I love strange people.  Let me clarify.  I love the quirky, offbeat, and freakishly brilliant.   These are people who might obsess over a certain historical figure or know everything imaginable about farming practices during the Neolithic period.  They might read 5 books a week on whatever topic has captured their keen attention and then move onto their next area of study.  If they were teenagers in the late 1980s, they made hundreds of mix tapes full of songs by unknown bands.  While perhaps a bit socially awkward, these kinds of people are both infinitely gifted and g

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