Reading Addict

Girls, Girls, Girls by Laura

When my nephew was much younger and not yet acclimated to the pretend-gender-wars dynamic of family Game Night, he started to cry when my sister and I taunted the “boys” team with chants of “Girls rule, boys drool!”

(It’s okay. We apologized and explained, he felt better, and nobody remembers who won or lost because that’s not the point of Game Night, anyway, is it?)

But it reminds me of what it’s like to be a child – boy or girl – and how confusing, overwhelming, and lost you can feel when you’re expected to know the exact rules of each new situation.

Laugh until It Hurts by Rebecca

There’s a strange sense of pleasure I get from reading Tom Perrotta. Although his novels have an entertaining, gossipy, and voyeuristic quality, they have substantial substance at their core. They are at once laugh-out-loud funny and acerbic social commentaries. In his latest novel The Leftovers, the world has experienced a rapture-like phenomenon. Millions have disappeared, and those remaining are left to piece together their lives.

2011 Man Booker Prize Winner by Nick

The first thing one notices when reading Julian Barnes’ Man Booker Prize winning novel, The Sense of an Ending , is the impossible elegance of the writing. Henry James elegant. The subject matter certainly lends itself to the tasteful, somber, sometimes playful writing.

Favorite Reads of 2011 by Laura

Fiction

The Old Romantic by Louise Dean

This was one I wanted to read again the moment I finished it – indeed, as I was reading it, I wanted to read it again, if that makes any sense. It clips along at a galloping good pace, with excellent dialogue, oddball yet believable characters, and some of the funniest scenes I’ve read related to family and class, ever. Good show!

Endless Obsession by Nick

I recently heard a fascinating interview on NPR’s “Fresh Air with Terry Gross” program with author Scott Spencer. He spoke candidly and thoughtfully about his latest book A Man in the Woods which focuses on a man on a hunting trip who accidentally kills another man. Aside from one of Gross’s personal idiosyncrasies (her penchant to utter dryly ‘that’s funny’ rather than simply chuckling when she finds something humorous) there was something else that I couldn’t ignore.

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