Reading Addict

The Queen of Crime by Cindy Hulsey

Beloved British author P.D. James died on Thursday at the age of 94. She delighted her readers with her cerebral mysteries featuring detective Adam Dalgliesh and her life was as interesting as her novels. After her husband was injured in WWII she was forced to support her family. She worked for the National Health Service and didn't publish her first novel until she was 42. After the death of her husband a job in the Department of Home Affairs sustained her and gave her procedural knowledge she would use in her novels.

Books As Personal History by Cindy Hulsey

I love books; not just the stories they contain, but the packages themselves. I like the weight of a book in my hands, the smell of the pages; I like the crisp sound the page makes as it’s turned and the beauty of the cover art. But mostly I love the fact that my books not only provide triggers for memories both vivid and hazy of the stories I’ve experienced vicariously through their words, but also make up a timeline of my life.

Robert Galbraith Revealed by Adrienne Teague

Let's be real. Does anyone NOT know Robert Galbraith is a pen name for J.K. Rowling? Well, it's true. When The Cuckoo's Calling came out a couple of years ago, it was a big media ordeal about who leaked the author's identity. Being a contrarian, I avoided the book during the fracas because I didn't want to be seen reading the book causing all the annoying media stories.

The Dark Side of Suburbia by Cindy Hulsey

I’m fascinated by books in which a dark underbelly lurks. Victorian literature often contrasts the buttoned-up, polite and elegant visible world with the steamy, raw, and vice-ridden universe lying beneath it. Similarly, many contemporary novels expose the ugliness that prowls the perfectly manicured lawns and look-alike homes of suburbia when no one’s looking.

Below are some books in which the shadowy side of suburbia is exposed:

Beauty in Suffering by Cindy Hulsey

The Twelve Tribes of Hattie by first time novelist Ayana Mathis is a powerful novel full of suffering and beauty. After turning the last page the characters, their difficult lives, and Mathis’s mellifluous language continue to haunt me. Hattie Shepherd flees Georgia as a teenager in 1923, marries and has twins by the time she’s sixteen, loses those babies to pneumonia, then gives birth to nine more children.

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