Tulsa Area History

French Place Names In Oklahoma

spavinaw, olahoma

In the Dictionary of French Place Names in The U.S.A., René Coulet Du Gard writes that the first Frenchmen who came to the United States can be divided into three categories: the mainly Canadian-born trappers and wood scouts or "coureurs des bois," the missionaries, and those serving the House of France.

Barney S. Cleaver, Tulsa's First African-American Policeman

Home of Barney cleaver

Barney S. Cleaver, the first African-American policeman in Tulsa, was born in Newbern, VA in 1865. In Newbern, he attended public school until he was fifteen. He then moved to Charleston, WV where he initially worked on a steamer and later worked in the coal mines. As an Oklahoma & Gulf Coal Co. employee, he served as an immigrant agent, bringing more than four thousand employees from West Virginia to Oklahoma. 

Leighton Avery, Son Of A Highway Man

James Leighton Avery, son of Cyrus Avery, graduated from Tulsa's Central High School in 1921.  The caption accompanying his senior photograph reads, "Page the debater. Here we have him. In the winter he is a most polished 'city-slicker.' In the summer he changes to agriculturist on his own farm. Distinguishing trait--Oratory. Pet peeve--Spelling. Disposition--Obliging."

Famous Tulsan As A Teenager: Bruce Goff

bruce goff as a teenager

Bruce Goff, architect and Tulsa Central High School graduate, was already an apprentice for Rush, Endacott, and Rush when this 1922 senior photograph was taken. The caption next to his photograph reads, "An art student of high merit, he has made many of the attractive posters that decorate the corridors. He is a prominent member of Chiaroscuro and also the pride of many English teachers in theme writing. Secret longing---To grow tall. Chief Accomplishment---Futuristic art. Hobby---Program committees."

Local History FAQ: When Was The Medical Arts Building Demolished?

medical arts building

Both the Medical Arts Building, on the southwest corner of 6th and Boulder, and the Bethlehem Building, on the northwest corner of 2nd and Boston, came down on Sunday, July 12th, 1970. The 1970-07-13 Tulsa Tribune article called the demolition a "double-header."

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