Blogs

help with summer utility bills

On July 9, 2012 DHS will begin accepting applications for utility assistance through the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LiHEAP).

Eligibility is based on the size and the monthly income of the household. The one-time payments are $200 for a one-person household and $250 for a home with two or more people.

Write for Our Newsletter

In our quarterly newsletter Lit Bits, there is a section dedicated to the writings of adult learners and tutors called Learner to Learner. This section is a place for tutors to share learning strategies that they’ve found to be successful with their learners, or brag about their learner's latest achievement. Adult learners can submit book reviews, creative writings, letters, recipes, stories, or other items they’d like to share with other people in the program. 

Be a Power Up! Volunteer

Hey tutors!

Have some free time on your hands and want to help integrate new literacy students to the program? We need volunteers to assist us with our 2 hour orientation sessions for incoming students in which we discuss how the program works, what the expectations are of both students and their prospective tutors, and goal setting strategies in detail. 
 
If you think you might be interested in becoming a Power Up! volunteer, please call the Literacy Office at 918-549-7400. 

I'm interested in helping someone learn to read. How do I apply to become a literacy tutor at the library?

Featured Service

Recent statistics indicate that approximately 1 in 6 adults in Oklahoma perform at the most basic or below basic literacy levels. The Ruth G. Hardman Adult Literacy Service, located at the Central Library, promotes literacy across the lifespan through emergent and family literacy outreach initiatives and adult basic and English language instruction.

 

When Language Fails by Rebecca Howard

It happens once a week at choir practice on Wednesday evening.  Reading through a new piece of music will undoubtedly raise the question of whether or not to modify gendered language.  There’s only so much you can do with the words “king,” “father” and “lord” before you’ve made a piece of music entirely absent of lyricism.  Typically, the director will ask how strongly we feel about changing the language and a few eyes will dart to me, wondering what the most vocal resident feminist will suggest.  Ty

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