Blogs

History, Every Day & Up Close

History-with-a-capital-H can be difficult for some kids to grasp. ("Boring!"; "What does this have to do with me?"; etc.) One way to make history real (and relevant) is to prepare students with interesting background knowledge about the nitty-gritty, daily details of everyday lives of real people in history.

The Day the Children Celebrated Books (and We Celebrated Children)

"Children's Day" began in 1925 to bring attention to the importance and well-being of children. Almost from the beginning, the Association for Library Services to Children (ALSC), a division of the American Library Association, has been involved.

Officially, "El Dia de los Ninos/El Dia de los Libros" - also known as Children's Day/Book Day, or just "Dia" - is an opportunity for libraries to connect children with diverse books and all of the wonderful learning and growing that great literature can bring.

Windows and Mirrors: "The Snowy Day"

A famous librarian dictum (yes, there are famous librarian dictums!) is that picture books should be both windows and mirrors for children.

Windows: into other worlds, knowledge, meaning.

Mirrors: reflecting unique experiences, cultures, and lives.

Before "The Snowy Day" by Ezra Jack Keats was published in 1962, there were a lot of windows for African-American children...but no real mirrors.

April Workshop: Research Tulsa House And Building Histories

Tulsa house and buildings history workshop flyer

 

HOUSE HISTORY WORKSHOP

Session One: Wednesday, April 5th 4-6P

Learn how to use online resources to research the history of houses and buildings in Tulsa. 

Session Two: Wednesday, April 12th 4-6P

Learn how to use print and microfilm resources to research the history of houses and buildings in Tulsa.

 

Want To Plant A Vegetable Garden? The Library Now Has A Seed Library To Help You Get Started!

With the TCCL Seed Library, you can borrow seeds from a large variety of vegetables (and a few fruits and flowers as well) to take home and plant in your garden. Since, hopefully, the seeds will become plants, we don't expect you to bring those exact same seeds back. However, once the plant produces, you simply take a small portion of the vegetables, fruits, or flower, harvest the seeds and dry them, then return those to the library for other people to use.

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