Cindy's blog

An Unlikely Read-Alike Pair by Laura Raphael

If you said you loved Zadie Smith’s funny, literary, character-driven novels, an easy read-alike recommendation to make would be E.M. Forster.

Sincerely Yours by Rebecca Howard

I like irony.  Irony is funny.  I’m a fan of David Letterman, Jon Stewart, Stephen Colbert, and The Onion.  I enjoy darkly humorous books, and I’m not opposed to reading novels in which the main character is a terrible human being.  Still, I recognize that there’s a self-protective safety involved in remaining on the outside, looking in and (often) laughing at something.  There’s a certain amount of vulnerability required to express deep emotion about a person or a principle or idea—a vulnerability that is necessary for both the author and reader. 

The Books of Summer by Rebecca Howard

As I write this, we are experiencing the first full-fledged summer weather of the season—highs in the mid-90s, a light south wind, and a cloudless, expansive sky.   This is the summer I love.  Don’t talk to me in July when it’s too hot to be outside at 10 p.m., and you have to put booties on your dog when you take her out for a walk, so she won’t burn her paws crossing the street.  No, today is the perfect summer day—made for lazing poolside (friends with pools, call me!) with a great novel.   

House of Earth by Nick Abrahamson

This article first appeared in The July, 2013 edition of The Tulsa Book Review.

A Thousand Selves by Laura Raphael

*This article is adapted from Laura’s One Small Good Thing blog, a project this past spring in which she asked librarians to notice “one small good thing” per day for a month.

This is going to sound unnecessarily dark, but once, years ago, my therapist asked if I was having suicidal thoughts. "No," I answered. Then, "Well, yes, sort of? Like, I think about how great it would be not to be myself anymore. Not to be dead, exactly, but to wake up and just be some different person."

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