Cindy's blog

And You Thought Your Family Was Crazy by Rebecca

Memoirs are tricky business. There’s something both astoundingly brave and utterly foolish about inviting others into the deepest crevices of one’s life. Memoir may be second only to poetry as the genre that is most likely to create overly sensational or sentimental writing. But, like poetry, when memoir is done well, it is like chocolate cake—perfect in its simplicity. I enjoy reading memoirs, not because of any need I have to compare my personal history with those of their authors. In many cases, there is no comparison.

Isolation in Short Stories by Nick

There seems to be a tradition of using isolation as a theme in many modern short story collections. It might just be my maudlin nature that causes me to be intrigued, engrossed, and thereby seduced by this theme. I also think that working with issues of isolation and alienation work really well in the short story format. Authors can pack a meaner punch in a short story than in a drawn out novel.

The Universal Appeal of the Immigrant Experience Novel by Rebecca

The universal appeal of the immigrant experience novel

By Rebecca

Finding the Center by Rebecca

Coming of age novels are often relegated to the tween/teen set, and many are classified as young adult fiction. Still, many of my favorite novels are coming of age novels. Maybe it’s because of the extended young adulthood of my generation or perhaps it’s the realization that coming of age isn’t typically a one-time occurrence. Revelation and recognition occur throughout our lifetimes at the most unexpected and, sometimes, inopportune moments. I’m drawn to young adult fiction for this reason, but many adult novels deal with these universal themes, too.

Brushing Up on Your Zombie-ology by Nick

AMC’s season finale of Mad Men paved the way for another great, original series The Walking Dead. Originally a comic book by Robert Kirkman, The Walking Dead just might be the best, smartest zombie story since Danny Boyle’s 28 Days Later. Kirkman’s series is less macro, more micro.

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