Cindy's blog

Sci-Shy by Rebecca Howard

One of the guiding principles librarians use when connecting readers to books they will enjoy is that someone should NEVER apologize for his/her reading tastes.  I think, however, that I might also add: “but be willing to stretch.”  It’s just like our parents would explain “You don’t have to like everything, but you do have to try it.”    So, I can say with empirical backing that I don’t care for turnips or Harry Potter.  But, I’m guilty like everyone else of assuming I won’t like something based on its genre or cover. 

Pynchon's 9/11 Novel by Nick Abrahamson

Call it irony. Or kismet.

Peering into Windows by Cindy Hulsey

Riding in the backseat of our Impala as a child I got a feeling of guilty pleasure from peering into the lit windows we passed.  There was something intriguing about catching glimpses of activity in other homes.  A quick look into an apartment window and I could see that other people lived differently than I did.  I wanted to know their stories.  I still have this impulse, and must admit that I still can’t resist glancing into lit windows, but rather than veer off into a dangerous (not to mention illegal) pastime, I learned to channel my obsession into the more socially acceptable hobby of

Work It Out by Rebecca Howard

Everyone has experienced a bad job or two.  Some of us have experienced soul-sucking, hope-killing, brain-numbing, and bad with a capital “b” jobs.  I only have to think to the late 1990s when I worked for a small advertising company that produced on hold messages.  “Your business is important to us.  Please stay on the line and someone will be with you momentarily.”  Yeah, that stuff.  I was the person who wrote that.  Sorry. 

The Voices in My Head by Rebecca Howard

There are characters in fiction that occupy my head, and I suspect you have these too.   Serious readers take their fiction seriously and rightly so.  Fiction can shine a light on different facets of reality and speak to emotional, spiritual and universal truths.  I love it when an author creates such developed and distinctive characters that they remain with you for weeks, months, and even years after you complete a novel.  There are the classic characters, of course, that many people would cite as being indelible—Heathcliff, Pip, Elizabeth Bennett, Jay Gatsby, Atticus Finch, the list goe

Pages