Kent Haruf

The Voices in My Head by Rebecca Howard

There are characters in fiction that occupy my head, and I suspect you have these too.   Serious readers take their fiction seriously and rightly so.  Fiction can shine a light on different facets of reality and speak to emotional, spiritual and universal truths.  I love it when an author creates such developed and distinctive characters that they remain with you for weeks, months, and even years after you complete a novel.  There are the classic characters, of course, that many people would cite as being indelible—Heathcliff, Pip, Elizabeth Bennett, Jay Gatsby, Atticus Finch, the list goe

Sincerely Yours by Rebecca Howard

I like irony.  Irony is funny.  I’m a fan of David Letterman, Jon Stewart, Stephen Colbert, and The Onion.  I enjoy darkly humorous books, and I’m not opposed to reading novels in which the main character is a terrible human being.  Still, I recognize that there’s a self-protective safety involved in remaining on the outside, looking in and (often) laughing at something.  There’s a certain amount of vulnerability required to express deep emotion about a person or a principle or idea—a vulnerability that is necessary for both the author and reader.