rebecca

Epic Proportion by Rebecca

When I say Oedipus Rex, chances are you have a pretty visceral reaction. My first thought is of someone gouging out his own eyeballs. I don’t know why that particular image has remained with me ever since first reading parts of the play in middle school, but it has. (It might be my affinity for the dramatic.) The story of Oedipus is deeply imbedded in our collective unconscious—whether from reading the play or studying Freud’s stages of psychosexual development. It is a story that triggers our deepest anxieties about identity and destiny.

Let us help you find Your Next Great Read by Rebecca

Are you ever at a loss for what to read next? The library has a service to help you! Your Next Great Read is an online, form-based readers’ advisory service designed for adult library card holders. What does that mean, exactly? Fill out a survey about your reading interests and preferences, and we will create a personalized reading suggestions guide with authors and titles that you might enjoy.

Caramel Corn and Champagne by Rebecca

I will easily admit that I am among the great multitude of Downton Abbey fans feeling bereft after the second season’s final episode. Everyone has something to say about the series’ phenomenal success in the United States. After all, what do Americans want with this story of life in an Edwardian country estate? My answer is what could we NOT love about this romantic drama?

A Moment of Truth by Rebecca

This Beautiful Life by Helen Schulman is the story of a family in crisis. Richard and Liz Bergamot have moved to New York City from Ithaca in anticipation of Richard’s professional advancement. They have two children—a 15-year-old son, Jake, and a 6-year-old daughter, Coco. One night, after attending a party, Jake receives an explicit email from a young girl. He forwards it to a friend, who forwards it to another friend, until the email and its attached video has gone viral.

Laugh until It Hurts by Rebecca

There’s a strange sense of pleasure I get from reading Tom Perrotta. Although his novels have an entertaining, gossipy, and voyeuristic quality, they have substantial substance at their core. They are at once laugh-out-loud funny and acerbic social commentaries. In his latest novel The Leftovers, the world has experienced a rapture-like phenomenon. Millions have disappeared, and those remaining are left to piece together their lives.

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