Robert Goolrick

Southern Tragedy by Cindy Hulsey

A strong sense of place anchors Robert Goolrick’s mythic Southern Gothic tale, Heading Out to Wonderful. Set in the late 1940s in a small town in Virginia, the story is told from the perspective of lapsed time. Sam Haislett, who was a young child at the time of the events he narrates, relates the tragic tale of a doomed love affair between two lonely outsiders.

The Bigger They Are The Harder They Fall by Rebecca Howard

Robert Goolrick's The Fall of Princes is a voyeuristic morality tale of the excesses of 1980s New York. Written in first person, the novel tells the story of the dizzying rise and denigrating fall of the unnamed narrator. After failing as an artist, our protagonist, at the urging of his father, returns to the U.S. to study at the Wharton School of Business.

Slow Burn Books by Rebecca Howard

On the week before Banned Book Week, I’m reluctant to type “burn” and “book” in the same sentence.  However, “slow burn” is probably the best way to describe the pacing and the key appeal of The Silent Wife—a recent psychological thriller by A.S.A. Harrison.  With book jacket blurbs from the likes of Elizabeth George and S.J.

Breaking the First Rule of Book Club by Rebecca Howard

Photo of Rebecca Howard

I want to talk about book clubs.  I’ve been involved with several over the years and have found them to be deeply rewarding—each in their own ways.  There are a few dangerous pitfalls that book clubs have to strive to avoid, though.  In no particular order, here they are:
1) The book club becomes a wine club
2) The book club becomes a whine club
3) Not everyone reads the book
4) One individual (who typically has not read the entire book) dominates discussion
5) The same person selects titles each month

Work It Out by Laura Raphael

I love my job (I really, really do), but I’ve always been curious about what other people do for a living – how they spend their days, what issues and ideas and conflicts and goals of, say, a tax attorney, or a graphic designer, or a paper salesman. (Well, maybe not the last one. “The Office” pretty much fills that gap in my curiosity.)